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ISYAKU IBRAHEEM

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Download the complete library and information science project topic and material (chapter 1-5) titled ASSESSMENT OF UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMME OF LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SCIENCE IN SELECTED LIBRARY SCHOOLS IN NORTHERN STATES OF NIGERIA here on PROJECTS.ng. See below for the abstract, table of contents, list of figures, list of tables, list of appendices, list of abbreviations and chapter one. Click the DOWNLOAD NOW button to get the complete project work instantly.

 

PROJECT TOPIC AND MATERIAL ON ASSESSMENT OF UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMME OF LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SCIENCE IN SELECTED LIBRARY SCHOOLS IN NORTHERN STATES OF NIGERIA

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  • Name:ASSESSMENT OF UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMME OF LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SCIENCE IN SELECTED LIBRARY SCHOOLS IN NORTHERN STATES OF NIGERIA
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ABSTRACT

The study title “Assessment of Undergraduate degree Programmes of Library and Information Science available in the library schools in Northern states of Nigeria” was embarked upon in order to investigate Undergraduate degree programme of library and information science in selected University-base library schools in Northern states of Nigeria. Six research questions were formulated and answered. A survey research methodology was adopted .and documentary sources and semi-structured questionnaire were the instruments used to collect data. The responses from the sampled of the four library schools and their lecturers under study numbering 70 were studied and analyzed, using frequency tables and percentages and suggestions are made. The study discovered the degree programmes of library and information science available are, Bachelor of Library and Information Science (B. LIS), B- Tech. Library and Information Science (LIS) and B-Tech. Library and Information Technology (LIT) The requirement for admission into Bachelor‟s Degree programme are through UTME/post-UME and Direct-entry (DE). The finding showed that qualified lecturers and fund to acquire necessary and adequate facilities, such as internet connectivity, laboratory equipment for students are inadequate. The study therefore concluded that, differences in the programmes have no significant impact on the competency of librarians produced. In view of this numbers of recommendations were made with a view to improving the quality of the Library and Information Science Programmes in the library schools

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Title Page………… ………………………………………………………………………i

Declaration………………………………………………………………………….. ……ii

Certification……… ……………………………………………………………………. iii

Dedication……… ………………………………………………………………………iv

Acknowledgment ………………………………………………………………………. v

Table of Content……… ………………………………………………………………..vi

List of tables……… ……………………………………………..………………….…vii

List of Appendices …………………………………………………………………..…viii

Abstract……… …………………………………………………………………………ix

CHAPTER ONE: INTRODUCTION

1.1 Background to the study……………………………………………………………1

1.1.2 Concept of library and information Science …….……………………….2

1.1.3 NUC Minimum academic standard……. …………………………………..4

1.2 Statement of the problemme…………………………………………………………5

1.3 Research Questions ………………………………………………………………….6

1.3 Objectives of the study……… ……………………………………………………..7

1.5 Significance of the study ……………………………………………………………8

1.6 Scope and Limitation of the study…….. ……………………………………………9
1.7 Operational Definition of Terms ………………………………………………..……9

References….……………………………………………………………………………11

CHAPTER TWO: REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE

2.1 Introduction…………………………………………………………………………13

2.2 The Undergraduate degree programmes of library and information science………14

2.3 Admission into Undergraduate degree programme of library and information science…………………16

2.4 Faculty staff adequacy in the library schools……………………………………….19

2.5 Facilities for Teaching and Learning in Library Schools……………….………….22

26. The Nature of Curriculum Content of Undergraduate Degree programme of Library and information science…………………..23

2.7 Variations in the Curriculum of library and information science degree programmes……………………………………………………………30

2.8 Summary of the review. …………………………………………………………..…32

References …………………………………………………………………………….33

CHAPTER THREE: RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

3.1 Introduction ………….………………………………………………………….38

3.2 Research method adopted for the study ………………………………………….38

3.3 Population of the Study ….…………………………………….………………39
3.4 Sample and sampling Procedure ………………………………………………..40

3.5 Instruments for Data Collection …………………………………………………..42

3.5.1 Questionnaire …………………………………………………………42

3.5.2 Documentary Sources …………………………………………………42

3.6 Validation of the Instruments ………………………………………………….43

3.7 Reliability of the Instrument……………………………………………………43

3.8 Procedure for Data Collection …………………………………………………44

3.9 Procedure for Data Analysis ………………………………………………….44

Reference ………………………………………………………………………….46

CHAPTER FOUR: DATA PRESENTATION, ANALYSIS AND DISCUSSION
4.1 Introduction …………………………………………………………………….….47
4.2 Response Rate ……………………………………………………………………..47
4.3 Data Presentation and Analysis…….………………..…………………………….49
4.3.1 Descriptive analysis………………………………………………………………49
4.3.2 Bachelor degree programmes available in library schools in Northern state of Nigeria………………….49
4.3.3 Admission Requirement into library schools in Northern state of Nigeria….………..…50

4.3.4 Adequacy of Faculty staff in Selected Library Schools of Northern States of Nigeria………………………………….54

4.3.5 Adequate Facilities Available for teaching and learning in library schools in Northern State of Nigeria……………………………58

4.3.6 The Nature of Curriculum Content of Undergraduate Degree programme of Library and Information Science …………………….64
4.3.5 Variations in Curriculum of Undergraduate Degree of Library and formation Science programme…………………………………………….67

References…………………………………………………………………………………………………..70
CHAPTER FIVE: SUMMARY, CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATIONS
5.1 Introduction…………… ……………………………………………………………71
5.2 Summery of the study …………..…………………………………………………..71
5.3 Summary of the Major Findings………….……………………………………….72
5.4 Conclusion …………………………………………….…………………………..73
5.5 Recommendations ……………………………………………………..………….74
5.6 Suggestion for Further Research……………………………………………….…..76
BIBLIOGRAPHY ………………………………………………………………………77
Appendices …………………………………………………………………………….81

LIST OF TABLES

Table 2.1: Scoring and Graduating System……………………….. ……………………28

Table 3.1 Population of the Study …………………………………….…………………40

Table 3.2: Selected Library Schools in Universities in Northern States of Nigeria their
Faculty Staff and Generation……………………………………………………………..41

Table 4.1: Response Rate … …………………………………………………………….48

Table 4.2: Distribution of Respondents by Rank……………………..……………….…48

Table 4.3: Degree Programmes Available in Selected Library Schools……………..…50

Table 4.4: Categories of academic staff………………………………………………………………….55

Table 4.5: Categories of non-academic staff ………………..……………………………56

Table 4.6 Types of Building facilities Available …………………………………….58

Table 4.7 Types of Teaching and Facilities Available …….……………………………60

List of Appendix Appendix I Questionnaires………………………………………………………………81

Appendix II NUC BMAS…………….…………………………………………………………………..85

CHAPTER ONE

INTRODUCTION

1.1 Background to the Study Library science education and training programme in Nigeria is linked to the general social and political history of the country. The mode of library education and training in Nigeria during the colonial period up to 1960 was conducted through short courses organized for the staff of local reading rooms and the Native Authority libraries. In the late nineteenth and early twentieth century‟s Library Science Education in many of the former British Colonies derived its educational and professional structures from the United Kingdom (UK) standard. Carroll (2011) reported that, the British model for library science education included training in the workplace in an apprenticeship mode and eventually involved examinations in both general and specialist knowledge set by the local professional association or Library Association (LA) of U K. However, the only method of becoming a librarian in Nigeria was by taking the Associate ship of the British Library Association (ALA), either by attending British library schools or by correspondence courses offered by the British Association of Assistant Librarians or by part-time study. This was the practice after the collapse of the regional library training institute established at Achimota Ganah in 1944, to help prepare the first corps of librarians for Nigeria and other Anglophone countries of West Africa. (Ahmed 2012) The ALA training was mostly foreign-oriented and the services in the existing libraries where the products worked were not customized towards meeting the increasing local demands for library services. As more libraries were established in Nigeria to provide information support to the users, the need was expressed for trained librarians to run the services. According to Otike, (2012) initially, the early libraries were manned by expatriate librarians educated in the west; therefore something had to be done to train librarians locally. Situation was made worse with the departure of expatriate librarians immediately after independence.

1.1.2 Concept of Library and Information Science The concept of Library and Information Science (LIS) has been explained by various scholars. Singh (2008) defined LIS as a profession concerned with the knowledge and skill by which records of human communication are collected organized and utilized, the librarian is a mediator between man and the graphic records that his and previous generations have produced and the goal of librarian is to maximize the social utility of these records for the benefit of humanity. Similarly, Ozioko and Nwabueze (2010) further lamented that, LIS as a discipline concerned with the study of the principles and skills required for systematic collection, organization and use of society‟s information resources in libraries. Library science programmes focus intensively on the organizational structures that contain information. Library Science as an interdisciplinary or multidisciplinary devoted to applying theory and technology to the creation, selection, organization, management, preservation, dissemination, and utilization of collections of information in all formats. Partridge (2011) defined LIS education as entailing librarianship, information management, records management, archive practice, and teacher librarianship. However, there is no generally agreed-upon distinction between the terms library science, librarianship, and library and information science, and to a certain extent they are interchangeable, perhaps differing most significantly in connotation. It seems today that the term LIS is most often used where most librarians consider it as only a terminological variation, intended to emphasize the scientific and technical foundations of the subject and its relationship with information science. Library and information science can also be seen as an integration of the two fields, library science and information science which were separate at one point. The aim of library and information science education are to produce qualified manpower to manage libraries. Anyanwu et. Al. (2013) posits that, Library and Information Science as a discipline is designed to produce information professionals that will competently serve different stakeholders for development. As noted by Combes et al (2011), new graduates are key stakeholders in Library and Information Science and Library and Information Management (LIM); this implies that the graduates-to-be should be adequately repositioned in theory and in practical knowledge.

1.1.3 The NUC Minimum Academic Standard for Library and Information Science Programme
The National Universities Commission (NUC) is responsible for University Education in Nigeria; it has the powers to lay down Benchmark Minimum Academic Standards (BMAS) for Undergraduate Programme for all the Universities in the Federation and to accredit their degrees and other academic awards. The NUC Approved BMAS in Library and Information Science (LIS) for Undergraduate Degree programme for all Nigerian Universities of 2007, the guide line provides range of courses considered as Core/compulsory; Cognate; Restricted and Unrestricted electives; as well as Pre-requisite courses spread across the 4-5 years for those admitted through Unified Tertiary Matriculation Examination (UTME), and 3-4-years through Direct Entry (DE) Degree programme respectively. Nwosu, et.al (2013), reported that, it is mandatory for each University to comply totally with the compulsory courses in the BMAS approved by a regulatory body. The Standards allows each university a high degree of flexibility in fashioning its programme in the process of interpreting these guidelines. Details are presented in APPENDIX II.

1.2 Statement of the Problem Information is a crucial factor in today‟s public and private sectors; management of libraries, records, archives, and information centers is an increasingly important preoccupation. There is a high value placed on information which is vital to the success of the organization‟s planning and decision making in the emerging global business and governance. Information professionals need to have knowledge and skills to function effectively in a work please. Abubakar (2010) quoting Varalakshmi (2006) opined that, information professionals must possess skills in selection, content management, knowledge management, organization of information on intranets and Internet, research services, developing and maintaining digital libraries, and bringing information resources to the desktop which requires educators to assess the skills needed so as to prepare the students for the challenges of employment. Thus, Library Schools are expected to impart relevant knowledge, techniques and skills for effective and efficient library and information services. Most of the fresh graduates from the library schools, in some instance, are unable to function effectively at the work place. Routine tasks such as reference work, cataloguing & classification and indexing are hardly performed by the newly graduates. Saleh (2012) reported that, from the field of practice based on the accounts and reports of library administrators and employers they have indicated the consistent short comings on the part of the newly graduates. Therefore, study of this nature is very significant in order to determine the extent of inability of the newly graduates to function effectively in a work place.

1.3 Research Questions This Study sought to provides answers to the following research questions:

1. What Undergraduates Degree programmes of library and information science are available in library schools in Northern States of Nigeria?

2. What are the Requirements for Admission into the Undergaduate Degree in Library and Information Science in library schools in Northern states of Nigeria?

3. How Adequate are the Faculty Staff to impart appropriate knowledge to Students in library schools in Northern States of Nigeria?

4. What Facilities are provided and available for teaching and learning in the library schools in Northern states of Nigeria?

5. What are the Nature of library and information science Curriculum in the library schools in Northern States of Nigeria? 6. What is the impact of the Variations in the Curriculum of library and information science on competence of the librarians produced in library schools in Northern states of Nigeria?

1.4 Objectives of the Study The Objectives of the study were:

1. To identified Undergraduate Degree Programmes of library and information science are available in library schools in Northern States of Nigeria

2. To find out the Requirements for Admission into the Bachelor Degree in Library and Information Science in library schools in Northern states of Nigeria

3. To find out how Adequate are the Faculty Staff to impart knowledge to Students in library schools in Northern States of Nigeria

4. To find out Facilities Available for teaching and learning in the library schools in Northern states of Nigeria

5. To examine the Nature of library and information science Curriculum in the library schools in Northern States of Nigeria

6. To determine the impact of the Variations in the Curriculum of library and information science on competence of the librarians produced in library schools in Northern states of Nigeria

1.5 Significance of the Study The Study would be significant in the following ways: It would bridge the gap in knowledge of Undergraduate degree programmes of library and information science in an area of admission requirement, adequacy of faculty staff, facilities for teaching and learning, Nature of the curriculum and Variations in the Curriculum. This would improve the quality of the products from Nigerian Universities by producing competent librarians who are lifelong learners and continue to learn beyond school. It is hoping that; it would help to reveal the extent of variations in the curriculum of library and information science programme in Northern states of Nigeria in particular and in Nigeria in general. Finally, the research would be of help to the will be researchers who might continue from where this research stops.

1.6 Scope and Limitation of the Study This Study is an assessment of Undergraduate Degree programmes in University-base library schools in the Northern state of Nigeria. The Study was limited to Undergraduate Degree Programme of Library and Information Science because it is the minimum entry requirement into the library Profession as stipulated by the Librarians Registration Council of Nigeria (LRCN). Also, according to Nwokocha, (1996), the Undergraduate degree in Library and Information Science is the most common and consequently generally accepted in Nigeria as the first professional qualification. Specifically it centered in an area of available degree programmes in library science,

Requirement for admission, Adequacy of Faculty staff, Facilities available for teaching and learning, Nature and Variations in the Curriculum of library and information science programme. The Study was not cover other types of library schools such as polytechnic and Colleges of Education.

1.7 Operational Definition of Terms Within the framework of this study, the following operational terms are defined to clarify their meanings.

Assessment: the determination of the worth and value of something. It is a systematic process of measuring and usin the results obtained in taking relevant decision about a programme.

Curriculum: Unified series of courses and other educational experiences based on the programme‟s goals and objectives.

Faculty Staff: All academic staff in the department.

Library School: A Department in University awarding a minimum of Bachelor degree in library and information science. Library and

Information Science: Formal education and training programme of library and information science librarians.

Programme: A Coordinated variety of learning activities that is sequentially planned over a substantial time span and is directed toward definite objectives.

Undergraduate: Studying first degree programme

References

Abubakar, M.K (2010). ICT Knowledge and Skills Among Students of Library and Information Science in Umaru Musa Yar’adu, The Information Manager Vol.10 (1 & 2)

Ahmed, A. O. (2012) Modern Trends in Library and Information Science Education in Nigeria: Challenges and the Way Forward, Library Philosophy and Practice (e-journal) Paper 831
http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/831 Retrieved on 20th Dec. 2012

Ajala, J. A (2002) Designing content of the Curriculum: Aguide to practice: Ibadan MayBest Publications.

Ajibero, M. I. (2008) The Education of Library and Information Professionals in Nigeria (Lecture note)

Anunobi, C.V. and Ukwoma, S.C. (2009) Strategies for Re-skilling the Library and Information Profession in Nigeria
http://www.degruyter.com/dg/viewbooktoc.chapterlist.resultlinks.fullcontentlink. Retrieved on Nov. 2012

Anyanwu, E.U. et.al (2013) Repositioning Library and Information Science Graduates in Nigeria for Self-Employment through Entrepreneurship Education, American International Journal of Contemporary Research Vol. 3 No. 8. http://www.aijcrnet.com/journals/ Retrieve on Nov. 2012

Carroll, M. et. al (2011) Commonwealth of Uncertainty: How British and American Professional Models of Library Practice Have Shaped LIS Education in Selected Former British Colonies and Dominions, World Library and Information Congress; 78th IFLA General Conference and Assembly. http://conference.ifla.org/ifla78 Retrieved on 21st Dec.2012.

Combes, B. et al (2011). Are you really ready? What the new graduates reveal about their first years in the work place, ALIA 5th New Librarians Symposium, Perth, Australia, and 16-18 September.

Department of Library and Information Science Ahmadu Bello University (ABU), Zaria: Undergraduate students hand book (2012)

National Universities Commission Benchmark Minimum Academic Standards (BMAS) for Undergraduate programmes in Nigerian Universities 2007

Nwokocha, U (1996) “Development of library schools in Nigeria: the place of the Bachelor’s degree programmes”, Librarian Career Development, Vol. 4 Iss: 4.
23

Nwosu, R, Eyisi, G. and Ekene, A (2013) Comparative Study of Library and Information Science Curricula in Tertiary Institutions in South-East Nigeria. IOSR Journal of Mechanical and Civil Engineering (IOSR-JMCE) e-ISSN: 2278-1684 Volume 5, Issue 5 www.iosrjournals.org Retrieved 2sn June 2014

Otike, J. (2012) Library and Information Science Education in Africa: past, present and future: A paper presented at the 12th Annual Conference of the Dept. of Information Studies, University of Zululand, South Africa.

Ozioko, R.E and Nwabueze, A.U (2010) Justification for Reform in Library and Information Science Education in Nigerian Universities, Library Philosophy and Practice.

Saleh, A.G (2011) Educators’ Perspective on Library Education in Nigeria Library Philosophy and Practice. http://unllib.unl.edu/LPP/

Saleh, A.G (2012) Employers’ Expectations of Library Education in Nigeria Library Philosophy and Practice. http://unllib.unl.edu/LPP/

Singh, S.P. (2008) Library and Information Science Education in India: Issues and Trends Malaysian Journal of Library & Information Science, Vol.8, no.2,

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