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Download the complete computer science project topic and material (chapter 1-5) titled Design and Implementation of Special Education Apps Information Management System here on PROJECTS.ng. See below for the abstract, table of contents, list of figures, list of tables, list of appendices, list of abbreviations and chapter one. Click the DOWNLOAD NOW button to get the complete project work instantly.

 

PROJECT TOPIC AND MATERIAL ON Design and Implementation of Special Education Apps Information Management System

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  • Name: Design and Implementation of Special Education Apps Information Management System
  • Type: PDF and MS Word (DOC)
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  • Length: 57 Pages

TABLE OF CONTENTS

LIST OF FIGURES……………………………………………………………………..vi
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS……………………………………………………………viii
CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION………………………………………………………..1
1.1 Introduction of Mobile Application and Special Education………………………. 1
1.2 Existing Problem of Mobile Application and Special Education………………….1
1.3 Related Work……………………………………………………………………… 2
1.4 The Overview of SpedApps………………………………………………………. 4
CHAPTER 2 REQUIREMENTS ANALYSIS………………………………………… 6
2.1 User Requirements………………………………………………………………… 6
2.1.1 System Environment Requirements…………………………………………… 6
2.1.2 User Interface…………………………………………………………………. 7
2.1.3 User Characteristics and Assumptions………………………………………… 7
2.2 Functional Requirements………………………………………………………….. 7
2.2.1 User Case Diagram……………………………………………………………. 7
2.2.2 Unregistered Users’ User Case Descriptions…………………………………..9
2.2.2.1 Search Apps……………………………………………………………….. 9
2.2.2.2 Registration………………………………………………………………… 9
2.2.3 Normal Users’ User Case Descriptions……………………………………… 10
2.2.3.1 Search Apps……………………………………………………………… 10
2.2.3.2 Users Log In……………………………………………………………… 10
2.2.3.3 Users Log Out……………………………………………………………. 11
2.2.3.4 Users Forget Password and Reset Password………………………………11
2.2.3.5 Users Suggest Apps……………………………………………………….11
2.2.3.6 Users Suggest App’s Tags……………………………………………….. 12
2.2.3.7 Post Review……………………………………………………………… 12
2.2.3.8 Profile Management………………………………………………………13
2.2.4 Admin Users’ User Case Descriptions………………………………………. 13
2.2.4.1 Search Apps……………………………………………………………… 13
2.2.4.2 Users Log In……………………………………………………………… 14
2.2.4.3 Users Log Out……………………………………………………………. 14
2.2.4.4 Admins Add Apps…………………………………………………………14
2.2.4.5 Apps Management……………………………………………………….. 15
2.2.4.6 User Management………………………………………………………… 16
2.2.4.7 User Comments Management…………………………………………… 17
2.2.4.8 News Management………………………………………………………. 17
2.2.4.9 Report……………………………………………………………………. 18
2.2.5 Non-Functional Requirements………………………………………………..18
2.2.5.1 Security…………………………………………………………………… 18
2.2.5.2 Speed…………………………………………………………………….. 18
2.2.5.3 Usability………………………………………………………………….. 18
2.2.5.4 Maintainability…………………………………………………………… 18
2.2.5.5 Scalability………………………………………………………………… 19
2.3 Summary………………………………………………………………………… 19
CHAPTER 3 DESIGN………………………………………………………………… 20
3.1 System Architecture……………………………………………………………… 20
3.2 Web Interface Design……………………………………………………………. 21
3.3 Database Design…………………………………………………………………. 23
3.3.1 Entity-Relationship Diagram………………………………………………… 23
3.3.2 Relational Database design by ER mapping………………………………….25
3.4 Summary………………………………………………………………………… 28
CHAPTER 4 IMPLEMENTATION………………………………………………….. 29
4.1 User Account Module…………………………………………………………… 29
4.1.1 Salted password hashing Algorithms………………………………………… 30
4.1.2 Authentication and Authorization…………………………………………… 30
4.2 App Search Module……………………………………………………………… 33
4.3 Admin Module……………………………………………………………………35
4.3.1 App Management……………………………………………………………. 36
4.3.2 App Evaluation………………………………………………………………. 39
4.4 User Module……………………………………………………………………… 41
4.5 Summary………………………………………………………………………… 43
CHAPTER 5 TESTING……………………………………………………………….. 44
5.1 The Importance of Software Testing…………………………………………….. 44
5.2 Testing Plan……………………………………………………………………… 45
5.2.1 Website Display Test………………………………………………………… 45
5.2.2 Website Accessibility Test…………………………………………………… 45
5.2.3 Function testing……………………………………………………………… 46
5.3 Summary………………………………………………………………………… 46
CHAPTER 6 CONCLUSION…………………………………………………………. 47
REFERENCES………………………………………………………………………… 48
LIST OF FIGURES
Figure 1 Unregistered User Case Diagram……………………………………………… 8
Figure 2 Normal User Case Diagram…………………………………………………… 8
Figure 3 Admin User Case Diagram…………………………………………………… 8
Figure 4 System Architecture…………………………………………………………. 21
Figure 5 SpedApps Home Page……………………………………………………….. 22
Figure 6 SpedApps Admin User Dashboard……………………………………………23
Figure 7 SpedApps Admin User App Management Dashboard……………………… 23
Figure 8 SpedApps ER Diagram……………………………………………………… 25
Figure 9 Results of Mapping Normal Entities: APP and USER……………………… 26
Figure 10 Results of Mapping Weak Entities: COMMENT and MODIFICATION…. 26
Figure 11 Results of Mapping Relationship Types…………………………………… 27
Figure 12 Results of Mapping Multivalued Attributes…………………………………27
Figure 13 Pseudo Code of Salted Password Hashing Algorithms……………………. 30
Figure 14 Screenshot of User Registration……………………………………………. 31
Figure 15 Screenshot of User Login………………………………………………….. 31
Figure 16 Session Code Sample………………………………………………………. 32
Figure 17 Password Recovery………………………………………………………… 33
Figure 18 Screenshot Of Search App Main Page……………………………………… 34
Figure 19 Screenshot Of App Search Result with “Free” as Filter…………………….34
Figure 20 Sample Code Of App Details by AJAX…………………………………….35
Figure 21 The Workflow Chart Of Admin Module……………………………………35
Figure 22 Screenshot Of Approved Not Edited Apps List……………………………. 37
Figure 23 Sample Code of App Category by AJAX………………………………….. 39
Figure 24 Screenshot Of Checking the existence of Apps……………………………. 40
Figure 25 Sample Code of App Crawler Function……………………………………. 40
Figure 26 Screenshot of App Evaluation Form……………………………………….. 41
Figure 27 Workflow of Normal User Module………………………………………… 41
Figure 28 Screenshot of App Main Page……………………………………………… 42
Figure 29 Screenshot of Writing a Review…………………………………………… 42

CHAPTER ONE

INTRODUCTION

1.1 Introduction of Mobile Application and Special Education

Mobile devices are becoming more popular worldwide, changing the way people learn
and access information (Alvarez, Alarcon, & Nussbaum, 2011). In the last decade, thousands of
novel applications in mobile learning are emerging. Research has provided evidence that mobile
technology is expanding the learning experience both inside and outside the classroom. It has
many advantages over traditional education technology such as being interactive, immersive and
engaging, increases in student’s motivation and the ease of personalized and collaborative
learning (Al-Hmouz, Shen, Yan, & Al-Hmouz, 2010). However, there are some considerations
when implementing mobile educational applications for students, especially for students with
special educational needs.
Special education programs are designed for teaching students with special educational
disabilities such as: learning disabilities, mental retardation, speech impairment, physical
disabilities and developmental disabilities (Glass, 1983).

1.2 Existing Problem of Mobile Application and Special Education

Due to these special educational needs, some of the mobile applications apparently
cannot meet the need of all the students. It is important to identify which applications are designed with special educational considerations.
Also, thousands of special educational applications are launched on the iTunes and
Google Player daily, but the question for parents, educators, and therapeutic professionals is how
they can identify which applications are worth using. The applications industry is out to make a
profit, and many times application developers are very astute at making an application that
“looks” educational, but in reality is just full of ads and sneaky ways of getting young kids to buy
something or play games. While there are many advantages of mobile applications, the simple
fact is that it is tough for parents, educators, and therapeutic professionals to select appropriate
applications for their kids, especially for the kids with special needs.
Parents and educators cannot only rely on mobile applications to effectively engage
learners. Because the apps company may not fully realize the special need and implement the
apps meeting the special requirements. To learn how to use mobile applications in the classroom
effectively, educators and therapeutic professionals need some professional instructional
guidance. However, many teachers and therapeutic professionals have rarely received any formal
training in the knowledge, skills, and practices that are necessary to integrate mobile technology
in ways that will affect positive changes in students (Balderaz & Rosenblatt). New mobile
applications are emerging every day, and one-time training is not possible.

1.3 Related Work

With the massive quantity of mobile applications available, some groups and labs have
already built some evaluation tools to address this mobile application selection issue. There are
two potential solutions to address this problem: free form style reviews and reviews based on
some rubrics.
Free form style reviews are totally free form reviews, such as App Store user review and Amazon customer reviews, where no one is using a template or rubrics. Parents, educators, and
therapeutic professionals can post and share these reviews through the Internet. Reading some
user reviews before downloading the app, we can get broad feedback on a product. It can be very
useful when we’re looking for general issues. Some professional researchers recommend
applications and post them on their blogs or social networking sites, like Twitter or Facebook.
Some of them also conduct app evaluations and post their reviews including user guidance
through some evaluation blogs such as Teacherswithapps (http://www.teacherswithapps.com/).
However, free form style reviews have many limitations. First, when editors in
Teacherswithapps generate each review, it seems that there is no template to follow and they
need to create a detailed report based on every application. It is a time-consuming work. Second,
different people might have different evaluation criteria. It can cause a data consistency issue
even within the same evaluation site with many editors. Third, for the users such as educators
and parents, the information in these detailed reviews is not quite straightforward. Sometimes,
they might lose patience to read individual reviews.
The second solution is generating reviews based on predefined rubrics and templates.
There are many online searchable tools available now, such as Common Sense Media
(https://www.commonsensemedia.org/), MathApps (http://mathapps.kent.edu/), etc. Common
Sense Media is a nonprofit education website. It has seven categories: Apps, Books, Games,
Movies, Music, TV, and Website and publishes ratings and reviews for nearly everything kids
want to watch, read and learn. First, generating reviews based on predefined rubrics and
templates can ease the workload of editors when they evaluate each application. The professional
editors will evaluate each application based on predefined templates or rubrics, such as
evaluating app from app objective, content area, audience, protocols, and progress report, etc.,
which will establish a clear expectation for all users. Once the template has been formed, the
editors just need to follow the evaluation criteria when evaluating each app. Second, it provides
concise information, and it is easy for users to search and get their resources with standard filters,
such as filtering by grade. When you’re looking to find the best interactive multiplication
application that can be used in your classroom tomorrow, you can just type “multiplication,
grade, and objective” and the tool will query the database and return the matching applications.
You don’t need to navigate hundreds of lines of words to figure out whether the application is a
must.
However, there are no existing mobile application evaluation sites for special educational
applications. Research has already provided evidence that traditional and special educational are
different. There is an urgent demand for creating a tool to help the educators in special
educational area (Walser, Ayres, & Foote, 2012).

1.4 The Overview of SpedApps

The main goal of our project is implementing a special educational applications
information management system called SpedApps. SpedApps is not only a scientific, informative
and timely applications management system, but also is a searchable online database that
catalogs high-quality applications for special education, especially those focusing on science,
technology, engineering, arts, and math (STEAM).
The database categorizes each app by the app name, publisher, price, objective, content
area, domain, audience, and disability tags. Most of the app evaluation reports contain an
objective review, evaluating whether the app provides the information such as: practice,
feedback, progress, usability, and customization. Users can query the database through different
filters such as: app keyword search, app name search, cost, topic search, etc.

There are three groups of target users: admin users, normal users, and unregistered users.
Admin users are professional special educators, and they will evaluate applications, post their
reviews based on rubrics, manage and maintain the database. Admin users must continually
evaluate the apps in the database and modify app evaluation reports based on user suggestions
and update version of the apps.
Normal users and unregistered users are usually parents, educators, and therapeutic
professionals. They can access the evaluation database through the app search module interface.
The site currently contains reviews of more than 580 applications. The reviews can be filtered by
subject matter, name, or whether they’re free or for sale. SpedApps is not only a database, and it
is more like a social network community. Normal users can create their login accounts, post their
reviews and also can suggest modifications of currently existing formal evaluations. Many
research findings indicated that educators and parents not only like to search apps through social
networks but also can provide useful suggestions for other users (Richard E. F
erdig, 2016).

 

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